Latest Tiny House

We just completed our latest tiny house for a young couple in Gainesville FL. This house was by far our most complicated build with many custom built-in’s and some unique options.

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Where’s the Planking?

One of the questions I’m frequently asked when someone is building a tiny house and they make it to the interior is “where do I find the interior pine tongue and groove planking (siding)?” I had the same question when I built my first house. I remember wandering the lumber isles of Home Depot clueless. Even describing it to an associate didn’t help as they didn’t know what I was talking about. The problem is that it’s not a hot seller outside the tiny house crowd. There aren’t too many people covering their basement walls with this stuff like there once was. However, it’s great for tiny houses since it’s lightweight, durable against the vibrations encountered in a tiny house on the road, and installs easily.

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Tiny Tiny House

For a little while I’ve wanted to turn one of my house designs into a model that could serve as inspiration for someone aspiring to live tiny. Well a few weeks ago I submitted my design to a 3D printing service and today I got my first model in the mail! Check it out, it’s pretty cool!

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You can’t see it in this picture, but when you look inside you can see both the sleeping loft and storage lofts inside.

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It’s 5-1/2” long.

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Even the trailer is detailed underneath.

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If you want one for yourself you can find them at Shapeways. They ended up costing a lot more than I had expected, so they aren’t for everyone. But it does look really cool on my desk :)

Tiny Home Builders Trailers

When I built my first tiny house I used a standard equipment trailer with just a few special requests. These requests included leaving off the ramps, not having a dovetail (which is a slanted back which helps when loading heavy equipment like tractors), and using heavy duty axles. I actually forgot to have them leave off the front guard (which is a piece of metal on the front of the trailer that stops your equipment from rolling too far forward). That ended up not being that bad of a mistake since it made me build the front compartment which I ended up really liking and has stuck with several of my other designs.

While building on a standard trailer is definitely not a problem, there are a few things that I have had changed over the years for our houses to improve the way they are attached as well as to make the trailers a little lighter. I’ve been offering these trailers to others as well if they contacted me directly (which several have), but I recently decided that I needed to set up something a little more formal so that anyone who was interested could get one (without knowing the special handshake ;).

So we’ve introduced our new line of trailers specifically made for tiny houses over at https://www.tinyhomebuilders.com/tiny-houses/Trailers

These trailers have many of the special requests of my first trailer as well as a few more. Most notably are the steel flange and the metal deck replacement.

Steel Flange

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A typical trailer has wood decking that runs the length of the trailer. That decking is supported by steel beams (cross members) that run perpendicular to the decking and attach to the sides of the trailer. Since the subfloor of your house needs to be attached to the metal of your trailer you may think that the cross members would be a good choice. The problem with using those is that since they run in the same direction as the floor joist, you would have to perfectly line up the floor joist with those beams. Those beams are also pretty far away from the subfloor since they are under the wood decking, which would require a really long bolt. What you really need is metal that is running perpendicular to the subfloor joist and is right up against the subfloor. While the trailer side beams match both those requirements, it’s a pretty thick metal and is usually a ‘C’ channel which doesn’t give you much room to drill. So the best option is to just add brackets (that is how we used to do it) or a flange to the sides.

Why not pre-drill the flange or weld the bolts to the trailer?

While having the bolts welded to the trailer may seem like a good thing, it’s actually a pain to work with and doesn’t give you a good way to attach the subfloor (when the bolts are on the back and front). If the bolts are welded to the sides of the trailer you’ll need to make sure that you have a joist in that exact location to attach to it (not exactly builder friendly). This can require you to add an extra joist or change your plans around. It can also be a pain to work with a fixed bolt since you will need to predrill your wood before putting it in place. This can be hard to line up correctly and you will need to do so before you attach the board to anything. While it can be worked around, as a builder, I just don’t want that hassle.

The flange on the other hand allows you to put the bolts wherever your joist end up after you’ve constructed the subfloor. That’s why we don’t predrill the flange either. While it may seem intimidating to drill your own holes through the metal it is actually quite easy. It doesn’t take any special tools other than a standard drill and a good drill bit. Others like to talk about plasma cutters and special drills to scare you into thinking that you can’t do it. But you’re about to build a house, what’s a few more holes to drill.

Bolts welded to the back or front of the trailer are even worse. In these locations the subfloor doesn’t typically hang over the edge, so what is the bolt supposed to attach to? Cantilevering the subfloor over the back edge just so you can accommodate that bolt seems a little unnecessary.

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Finally, the flange also increases the width of the trailer, thus reducing the amount that the subfloor needs to extend unsupported over the edge of the trailer. More support is always a good thing.

Replace the wood decking with metal beams

By replacing the wood decking with metal beams, we eliminate some of the weight of the wood decking and provide another place to bolt the trailer to. Not to sound too redundant, but these beams are up against the subfloor and are perpendicular to the joists.

Summary

Basically what it comes down to is you want to have metal on your trailer that runs the length of the trailer that will give you a good place to attach your house too. If your trailer doesn’t come with those metal surfaces, you’ve going to have to add them.

I personally designed these trailers for what I want and need, and it’s what we use for our houses.

Tinier Living Pictures

Here are some pictures of the Tinier Living House I took while I was down in Florida

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The front door (on the back of the trailer). The soffit still isn’t done under the overhang, but that is the last exterior item I have to do.

Loft Window

This is the front of the trailer. The loft window is opened up to let some air in.

Sleeping Loft

This is the view as you come up the ladder. Lots of light. When we were working up there  I would open up the windows and a little breeze would come through.  It would just make me smile. If only I had a nice cold beer in my hand instead of a hammer.

Storage Loft

There is a small storage loft above the front door.

Front Door from within

Bathroom door

The cabinets and closets aren’t in yet, so not much to see here.

Tiny House Workshop

Our little tiny house factory :)