The Fallacy of the 5 Year Plan

Five Year Plan (2)

 

This is an email from my friend and Virtual Tiny House Workshop co-host Mariah, who wanted to share this with you today

As you probably know, I’ve taught at more than 25 tiny house workshops and events over the past 2 years.

My favorite part is talking with everyone at the workshops, hearing their stories, and helping them start their journey.

Every time we teach a workshop, I end up losing my voice answering so many questions! It’s always fun to stay up late with people who share your values.

(Psst – I’m hosting the first and only VIRTUAL Tiny House Workshop this weekend! You can register here and join us!)

One thing I’ve been noticing more and more while teaching and speaking at these workshops, is that people have long timelines for their tiny house journeys.

I definitely think everyone should follow their own path and work within a time frame that suits their unique situation and life story. I’m all about marching to the beat of your unique drum!

That being said, I heard a lot of the same thing at the most recent workshop we spoke and taught at. We asked the group, “When do you plan to move into a tiny home?” and went around the room hearing answers.

“Five years”

“Ten years”

“6 years – when my kids are moved out!”

People were at the workshop, getting all hyped up, learning awesome new skills, and gaining knowledge and momentum – but that wouldn’t be put into action for another five to ten years.

Hmm, I thought, that seems like a lot of planning.

But then I thought about me, a few years ago.

See, I had a five year plan. I was 18 and I was going to save up all my money for five years, I was going to purchase the “vintage trailer of my dreams” – which at the time was an Airfloat.

I wanted something in the 25 foot long range (OMG can you imagine? I’m so glad I didn’t go that big haha).

I don’t think I quite understood just how expensive those rare beauties really are! In my mind, I would have my own place to park it, my own land with my own garden, and everything would happen at exactly the right time just the way I’d planned it all out.

Then, my entire five year plan of saving/researching/designing and planning went out the window when the COMET Camper (originally just a scrappy little 1969 Avalon) landed in my proverbial lap.

At 3 AM on a Tuesday morning (I’m not kidding – it was really that early and crazy), my friend from NYC dropped off what would become the COMET Camper and told me to do whatever I wanted to with it. I figured I’d sell it and use the money to put towards my imaginary “dream camper” – you know, stick to the plan.

Turns out, that scrappy little trailer WAS my dream camper, I just had to let the opportunity take shape and realize it’s potential.

Here’s the thing:

I’m really glad that the camper I live in now ended up in my driveway at 3 AM on a Tuesday 5 years ago, instead of 5 years in the future.

I’m glad because even though at the time it wasn’t in my “life plan” and that really freaked me out, I probably would have waited and waited and postponed making my major life change into camper life much longer than I had even planned. And since taking the leap, you know I can tell you it’s the best freaking thing that’s ever happened!

There’s no perfect time, and the sooner you get started, the better. That’s why we’ve put together the Virtual Tiny House Workshop. So you can get started now, take some action steps, and stop waiting.

We made it super affordable so that you don’t have to save up for years  to attend, and you can start sooner rather than later.

Planning is good – trust me I believe in good planning. Planning can lead to a lot of good stuff! Planning is smart.

But don’t be afraid of opportunity. Remember that it will NEVER be “the right time”, and there will ALWAYS be reasons (excuses) not to dive head-first into a new lifestyle and new way of living.

Things will never be “perfect” – so roll with it and if something amazing comes your way, allow yourself to say yes and let it work itself out.

If you’re ready to start taking those steps now, Dan Louche and I are excited to be bringing you the first and only Virtual Tiny House Workshop, called “Design/Build/Downsize”. We’ve got 8 trainings and lessons, step by step tutorials, live discussions and Q & A sessions, and more.

You can see the entire curriculum and register here >>>

We hope to see you there!

Latest Tiny House

We just completed our latest tiny house for a young couple in Gainesville FL. This house was by far our most complicated build with many custom built-in’s and some unique options.

20150814-IMG_8797

20150814-IMG_8798

The owner plans to build a deck in the front the length of the house. The large window is an accordion window which fully opens up and will provide a nice opening, joining the inside and the outside areas.

20150814-IMG_8744

20150814-IMG_8749

This is the interior view as you enter the house.

20150814-IMG_8751

This L-shaped shelf under the accordion window is for storage, with the larger portion also acting as a seat for a table (not shown). An extra chair will also be placed at the table so that two can dine.

20150814-IMG_8780

With the accordion window fully open it feels as though you are outside while standing in the house.

20150814-IMG_8754

Next is a cabinet that holds the range, oven, and additional pull out shelves for storage.

20150814-IMG_8772

Each of these shelves fully extend to hold a ton of stuff.

20150814-IMG_8757

The stairs lead up to the main loft. Under the stairs are open cubbies as well as a pull out pantry.

20150814-IMG_8758

20150814-IMG_8759

The pull out pantry extended.

20150814-IMG_8785

The stairs also hold a drawer and well as a storage pocket.

20150814-IMG_8786

20150814-IMG_8788

Across from the oven and the range is the refrigerator, dishwasher, and kitchen sink. There is also additional storage under the sink.

20150814-IMG_8747

Looking back towards the door, there is a washer/dryer combo unit in a separate closet. The bench seat wraps around the corner of the house to create a huge sitting area (where the owner plans to add custom cushions). The table can also be moved over to this area to create a larger dining area for additional people. The bench seat also opens up on hinges to reveal a very large storage area.

20150814-IMG_8762

The main loft has 2 windows and a skylight that provides a large amount of natural light. There is also a mini-split air conditioner to ensure the temperature is just right while sleeping. Finally a custom built shelf provides additional storage.

20150814-IMG_8769

The view from the lounge loft

20150814-IMG_8765

The view of the lounge loft. Since this loft is above the front door it is a little higher than the sleeping loft, but still comfortable to move around on. There is also an air circulator located on the top right of the back wall which periodically refreshes the air in the house.

20150814-IMG_8783

The bathroom has a bump-out over the tongue of the trailer that makes room for the bathroom sink. To the left is a toilet and to the right is a walk-in, tiled shower with a glass butterfly shower door.

20150814-IMG_8778

Under both lofts the owner wanted a more industrial look for their lighting. So we took track lighting that they liked and created this lighting solution.

Are you interested in learning more about tiny houses? We have several workshops coming up, including a new online workshop for those who can’t travel to Georgia. Get the full list of all our upcoming workshops at http://www.tinyhomebuilders.com/tiny-house-workshops

Lily’s Tiny Living

Lily attended one of our workshops last year and left determined to build herself a tiny house. So she bought one of our trailers and got to work. Now, as I say in our workshops, she gets to live in a temple of her awesomeness every day :) Congrats

P1016783

IMG_3832 (1)

P1015570

P1015573

Tiny House Insurance

Your Tiny House may be the most valuable asset you own in your life. Protection for it may very well be second most important. After all, weather damage, fires, and theft are all real world situations and although tiny houses on wheels can run, they can’t always hide.

 Take it from Dee WIlliams‘s friend, Kim Langston…

Saturday, April 4th - the discovery of the fire - and Sunday, April 6th after starting the cleanup process.

Photo:Tinyhouse43.com

Meg and Brandy of Tiny House 43 who accidently,improperly disposed of hazardous materials after a long day of building…

The paver driveway leading up to the tiny house of Casey Friday was destroyed when thieves towed the home away while he and his wife were gone. Photo: Photos Courtesy Of Casey Friday

Photo:Casey Friday

and Casey Friday, whose tiny home was stolen and pawned.

While no one relishes being an example of the unfortunate, there were things we all took away from it.

That is the beauty of the Tiny House community. Remember when everyone came together to crowdfund Kim Langston’s rebuild after her tiny house was caught in a barn fire? or when Tiny House 43 restored what they could from the ash covered sheathing? Or when news was shared of Casey’s quest to get justice from the thieves and reunite with his long lost tiny home?

We watched, were moved to help and encourage until all those challenges were overcome. The harder the struggle, the sweeter it was to celebrate their victory! And we all learned what NOT to do.

While some factors we can control (parking farther from adjacent buildings, taking the time to properly dispose of hazardous materials, or buying hitch and wheel locks). Some, we simply can not. Insurance for Tiny Houses under all unique circumstances, settled in one place or rolling along a highway, is non-existent. However,there are efforts in progress and it is a great opportunity for insurance agents to hop on board the Tiny house market.

Tiny Housers who creatively received insurance:

Photo: Runway Shanty

#1 – No matter what insurance you pursue,work with an insurance agent to work through the loopholes. It will also help other tiny home owners in the future by being able to recommend them to an agent that has already written an accepted coverage.

#2 Look for a reputable insurance agent already exploring the Tiny House insurance market.

Darrell Granz Insurance finalized a deal that will allow them to offer tiny home coverage in all US states (except Alaska & Hawaii), not just the West Coast states they currently serve. Even better, they will have coverage for transporting your tiny home and the unique solutions.

Coverages that will soon be available: moving Tiny Homes on wheels, full-time residents, self-built, construction type, tiny home rentals, AirBnB, and other alternative structures.

Archambault Insurance, CT, used by Runaway Shanty Tiny House.

Insurance Resource Center,Neil Gritz, Fairfield, IA, used by Aleks Lisefski.

Foremost Insurance (related to State Farm Insurance), only rumored to be able to insure tiny houses since they cover mobile homes, boats, etc.

 

Where there’s a will, there is always a way. Don’t let a gap in insurance discourage you to build tiny. BIG things are happening!

Tiny Investments are a BIG Payoff

The idea of living simpler has inspired homeowners and homebuyers of BIG houses to evaluate their quality of life and desires. As appealing as it is though, getting involved in the Tiny House movement may seem unattainable, or dare we say, “unrealistic”.

“Have you ever heard of Tiny Houses?”

 “Oh! The ones that are like 1000 sq ft. I could never do that! “

“Actually, most are under 200 sq ft.”

“What!! That’s crazy!” 

…………………………………..Sound familiar?

 No doubt, downsizing to those parameters barely seems possible. Entertain these thoughts though; What if letting go of a lifetime of possessions could be replaced with liberation? What if your partner, who doesn’t have the same tiny dream, could find a reason to accept yours? What if you owned your home and your home didn’t own you!

Well, with some creativity, those inhibitions can be swayed! No matter what your situation is, there IS a way to get involved in the tiny house movement, increase your income, and ultimately, get closer to living debt-free.

download (1)

Income property. For the person who loves the idea of tiny houses, but not actually living in one; they, too, can still reap the financial rewards. There are three options;

     1.   Backyard Rental. Generate steady income year round by renting it out to long term  tenants, in laws, or college students home for the summer.

  1. Bed & Breakfast/Hotel . Many Tiny Homeowners, like Nashville’s Music City Tiny House, use Airbnb.com to rent their Tiny Homes day by day.If a Tiny House is rented out daily for $100, that’s about $3,000/month.The best part is you can choose to rent it out as little or as much as you want. This is a win-win because budget travelers are looking for a local pit stop and Tiny House enthusiasts are looking for a trial run of the Tiny lifestyle. See some Incredible Tiny Houses available on Airbnb to get some ideas! download (2)

  2. Apartment To-Go. OK, so you don’t have much of a backyard, not even for a 16 foot trailer.  Rent it to a trustworthy tenant who will care for it on their own property or an RV park/campground. To avoid any problems, do a background check and install a GPS locator on the trailer just in case.

 

Temporary Housing. With such an unpredictable economy and all the foreclosure signs lining the sidewalks lately , its no question why homebuyers would be disromanticized and homeowners would find a way to payoff their mortgage ASAP. There are two options for these folks:

       1. Live in a Tiny Home temporarily as you build the BIG home of your dreams debt free. Ever hear of the Berzins family? They moved their family of four into a Tiny Home so they could save for their pay-as-they-build, “right-sized” home.

  1. The Berzin's Tiny Home (left) and BIG home (right)

    The Berzin’s Tiny Home (left) and BIG home (right)

  2. Rent out your BIG home while you live on premises in the Tiny House. Whether it’s avoiding foreclosure or doubling up on mortgage payments, simply enjoy someone else paying your mortgage with the outcome of owning a home.

 

Backyard Office. Tax write off! Work from home and use your return toward your mortgage.

1.  Working from home, but not AT home is a way to keep family life and career separate. Not to mention, less gas,wear and tear on your vehicle , and no traffic.

2. Be a traveling merchant. Use it as a concession stand for coffee and baked goods, sell roadside art,flowers,or antiques, or offer services like a mobile hair and nail salon.The possibilities are endless to earn an income with a Tiny House.

 

Home Sweet Home. Live in your dream tiny house full time.

  1. With a roof over your head and no mortgage bill in your mailbox (or P.O Box, for that matter) , take pleasure in knowing you won’t have to lug around that ball and chain for 15 or 30 years. Have more energy to enjoy your family and more time and money for experiences.

Whether you are current homeowners or looking to buy a home; hosting a tiny house can be an opportunity to get a BIG payoff for only a tiny investment.

THB-Banners-s-2With debt-free living within reach, it makes sense to ask questions. Tiny Home Builders understands the unique needs of every customer and offers quality customer service.

For a free consultation or to inquire about plans,trailers, and guides found on our website,please email us at support@tinyhomebuilders.com. For updates and special promotions, LIKE Tiny Home Builders on Facebook!

Saruse Family Tiny Home

Welcome to the Saruse Family’s Tiny House! Although tiny, it is filled with a lot of love; Johannah, her husband,Caleb, their four year old daughter,Carli, and two labs.

The Saruse Family

The Saruse Family

I had met Johannah about a year ago,through the “Dreaming of Living In a Tiny Home…” Facebook page, where she would occasionally post her journey of downsizing and the build. If it’s any indication of how appealing Tiny Houses have become; at the time,the Facebook page was under 50 members.Now,it’s already at 7,752! Johannah is one of the first to go from “Dreaming of Living in a Tiny House…” to actually living the dream! Thanks for taking the time to answer some questions for us, Johannah.

Before the BIG Move

unpacking

unpacking

What was life like before the move?

We had a 3 bedroom, 2100 sq ft house in a nice neighborhood with almost an acre lot. We had lots of upgrades and did lots of remodeling. It was perfect until…see next question :)

 

What inspired you to try living with less?

I came across the book “You Can Buy Happiness (and It’s Cheap)” and its all about living with less, minimalism, and downsizing. It mentioned Dee Williams and her tiny house and of course I didn’t believe it was possible to live in something so small so I had to google it. The book was great, I was intrigued by all of the minimalist ideas and in love with tiny houses by the time I was done. I started cleaning out our house and getting rid of the excess immediately, my husband panicked and didn’t want to leave the house for fear of what I would get rid of next! I cleaned out the clutter and organized room by room. Then we decided to see if we could live in less square footage so we sold off the extra furniture emptied the bonus room and closed it off, then the spare bedroom, then the breakfast room. Somewhere in the process we attended a tiny house workshop and decided we would build one. We ordered a trailer thinking we would build a tiny house just as a fun project – either travel in it or sell it for extra income. After lots of begging and pleading and making my case, I finally convinced my husband we could do this, we could really live in a tiny house.

What other tiny homes inspired you?

I’m not sure that any one tiny house inspired me to build one (even though they are just ALL adorable). I built one because the ideals inspired me…Minimalism, Freedom, Flexibility, Being Debt-Free, More Time with my Family, etc

 

What were your fears going into this lifestyle?

Without a doubt my #1 fear was the composting toilet. #2 was have we lost our minds. #3 How do our two large dogs fit into the picture? We really didn’t have many fears, we knew going in that at any time this situation is reversible. We can always sell the tiny house and rent or buy a traditional house if we are miserable.

 

 

Building the Tiny House

What kind of trailer did you use?

We bought two 20 ft trailers from Tiny Home Builders, one for us and one for my dad who is in the process of building his. I don’t remember the exact name for it but we have the lower trailer that gave us the extra few inches in the interior. We also ended up extending it 2 ft making it 22 ft long. Because our original intention was not to live in it ourselves, we thought 20 ft was plenty.

 

 

Tiny Home specs?

We maxed out everything, width and height and weight.
How long did it take to build? We started on Mother’s Day and moved in the first week of December so almost 7 months. We primarily worked only on the weekends.
How much did it really cost to build?

We stayed under $20K and there were lots of things we chose to splurge for and spend extra on so a tiny house could easily be built for less.
What was DIY and what did you leave to the pros?

We did everything ourselves.
Did you salvage materials or use all new? What would you recommend buying new?

We came across the doors at habitat for humanity but really we bought everything new. It was just easier to us.
What were your MUST HAVES?

Separate bedrooms with doors (and enough room for our king size bed), mini split heat and air system, full size appliances in the kitchen with plenty of counter space and of course the big screen TV.
If you had to do it all over again, what would you change the second time around?

We would have definitely started with the 24ft trailer it was a huge project to extend 2ft and those extra 2ft would have given us a little extra space in the bathroom or living room. We don’t think the sink in the bathroom is necessary you are so close to the kitchen sink so this space could have been used for something else. We didn’t put a fan/vent over the oven and the house is so insulated it holds all of the heat in, even in the middle of winter by the time dinner was on the table (aka tv trays lol) we felt like we were in a sauna. I do miss my disposal, this is such a little thing but I’d love to have this item back.

First wall up!

First wall up!

 

10464345_535556799900617_8699432083386238971_n10625085_598854576904172_5195925193373774598_n10689507_609722382484058_5085340531035352889_n

 

 

Tiny House Living

How has life improved for your family?

We have so much more free time because we don’t have a huge house or yard to maintain/repair or clean. We just went on a week long cruise vacation and by day 5 my daughter said “I miss my tiny house.” We are living in close quarters but having so much fun and enjoying it. We spend lots more quality time as a family and do many more family activities. We have really gotten a lot closer the last few months. Especially with the winter behind us we are spending lots more time enjoying the outdoors than we have in the past.

What is the biggest challenge?

Climbing the ladder to the loft after leg day at the gym :P But seriously, while that is a true story the biggest challenge is the dogs. They get in our way and we have to step over them all the time. They don’t have much space so we have to be sure to let them out often and walk them A LOT.

What are you most proud of?

I’m very proud that we did this all ourselves…from design to the finished product. We literally have people betting on how long we will last in the tiny house so I’m very proud to be proving them all wrong. We haven’t been this happy in a long time and we have no plans of moving out anytime in the near future.

Any Advice to future tiny housers?

Spend a lot of time on design and really think through how you use your house. We had to come up with new systems for everything. You really can’t be dirty or unorganized in a tiny house or your house will feel extra tiny. For example, we have to immediately fold laundry and put it away or we can’t sit on the couch. I think people overlook things like where will I put my dirty clothes or fold my dirty clothes, where will I put dishes while they dry since I don’t have a dishwasher. When you think about how much stuff you have did you really think about everything? What about the cleaning supplies or extra toilet paper? You still need those, not in the same quantities but you still need them. We rarely eat out and mostly cook at home, in our original plan we didn’t have a pantry. It was something we just forgot to think about. At the last second during the build, we tweaked our plans and added one. I am so thankful we did, I can’t imagine what we would do without that pantry.

What is in your Tiny house’s future?

Temporarily we are in an RV Park, we are planning to relocate to a new city or even state soon and buy land to park the tiny house. Probably at some point as our daughter gets older, we may build a bigger house 500-800 sq ft and do it debt free while we live in the tiny house but for now, we are loving the tiny life.

11018580_672535202869442_8114719466865668199_n10383986_599271856862444_2305879390035507211_n 10730982_599271826862447_3215078115884473237_n 10460295_599271873529109_3646980961570822241_n 603699_599271890195774_3379690501540009094_n 10632678_589038307885799_4808531813582101403_n saruse2 Saruseroom saruseupdate3 saruseupdate2 saruseupdateSaruse

Let there be light!

Let there be light!

Inaugural Trip to the weigh in station!

Inaugural Trip to the weigh in station!

saruseexteriorsaruse3

Check out the inside of this van, It’s amazing!

Recently Logan, who is buying a trailer from us for his upcoming tiny house build, was passing through Atlanta and wanted to hand deliver his deposit to me. When I was talking to him on the phone beforehand he told me that when we meet he was going to show me the inside of his van Disappointed smile I told him that was probably not the best thing to say to get people to meet with him Smile

20150305-IMG_8441

When I ended up seeing what he was talking about I was pleasantly surprised. Logan has spent the last couple years remodeling the inside of a used Sprinter van to best meet the needs of his active lifestyle, and he’s done an amazing job.

The first thing you’ll notice is the outside looks like a standard work van. He added the extra side windows, but other than that it looks pretty plain. That’s important since he wants to be able to park, and sleep pretty much anywhere. If you park an RV in a parking lot for the night, there is a good chance someone might hassle you. But a work van just blends into most places.

20150305-IMG_8440

When you open the side door is when you first notice this isn’t a work van.

20150305-IMG_8400

20150305-IMG_8403

Directly in front of the door is a seating area with a cool custom RV/marine table that rotates depending on the need. He designed it so that it would perfectly fit his favorite cups so that they wouldn’t move when the vehicle moved.

20150305-IMG_8414

Below the seating area is storage as well as batteries and an inverter to supply the van with AC power.

20150305-IMG_8405

Above the seating area is a compartment and a book shelf (the book shelf is out of view in the picture) with a really cool cut away design.

20150305-IMG_8407

The front seats also rotate if he has extra guests.

20150305-IMG_8404

Turning toward the back there is a kitchen countertop with running water on the left, a storage area on the right, and a bed in the rear.

20150305-IMG_8392

The countertop was probably the single most thing I was impressed with. It definitely draws the eye as soon as you walk in. It’s actually scrap pieces of plywood all glued together, sanded,  and then covered in an epoxy. The scraps are placed at an angle and looks fantastic!

20150305-IMG_8396

20150305-IMG_8416

Below the counter top is a drawer and refrigerator. Both are orientated such that they can be accessed from either the inside or from the outside without entering the van. This keeps the interior cleaner and saves precious seconds when you need that beer when coming back from an excursion Smile

20150305-IMG_8410

Under the other side of the counter top is the fresh water tank, pump, and water heater. The water heater is interesting as it just stores the hot water and the vehicles engine is used to heat it up.

20150305-IMG_8397

Across from the countertop is the storage area. I love this idea as the compartments can be easily switched out based on the activities that you’ll be doing on your trip. There is also a ledge on the bottom of each shelf that prevents the compartments from sliding out while driving.

20150305-IMG_8387

Moving on to the back he has a bed up top (which folds out of the way if needed), and storage for his bikes and camping gear below.

20150305-IMG_8433

20150305-IMG_8437

20150305-IMG_8421

20150305-IMG_8418

20150305-IMG_8424

When the back doors are open, he’s also devised a system so that he can take a shower in privacy (trust me, he has clothes on here)

20150305-IMG_8391

Finally, the entire roof is equipped with a wire system allowing for the storage of additional light items and/or for drying clothes.

20150305-IMG_8427

Logan estimates that he has about $50K into this project, but considering the expense of the vehicle itself and that an outfitted Sprinter van from Airstream runs about $150K (and probably wouldn’t meet his needs), that’s not too bad.

Logan has set up a website with additional details that can be found here: [coming soon]

5 Things To Downsize Today

Guest Post by Mariah Coz of CometCamper.com

0

Downsizing your stuff to prepare to live in a tiny home or other small space is probably the hardest part of the whole process of going tiny. There are a few reasons why it’s so difficult to downsize: emotional attachment, money or time invested, and the fact that many of our “things” represent an identity we want or used to want.

In the Tiny Transition + Downsizing E-Course, the 8-week e-course that shows you step by step how to downsize, de-clutter, clear your mind and space, we go through this in detail. The practical weekly lessons and private student-only forum allow you to make progress at your own pace within a group of like-minded friends on the same journey. I’ve been told that the group is a catalyst for lifelong change. That’s because we not only go through how to eliminate all sorts of crap from your life and space, but because we fundamentally change your relationship with “stuff”. It has the cascading effect of positively influencing every area of your life. You can learn more about Tiny Transition and Downsizing and register here. Class starts March 1st!

But, as hard as downsizing can be for some of us – I’ve found a few good, easy places to start. And that’s the hardest part – getting started! We call this “low hanging fruit”, and it’s the kind of stuff that is easier to let go of and builds momentum for tackling the tough stuff later on. So here are five things you can purge this weekend to feel awesome about making progress towards a simplified lifestyle.

1. Luggage and Bags
How many pieces of luggage do you have? How many purses? Probably more than you use! I used to have a bag problem. I had ALL different shapes and sizes – one for each occasion. But ultimately, you only need one or two great bags to make most of your luggage collection seem obsolete. If you’re hoarding this kind of item in your attic, time to let it go.

2. Craft supplies
This is a big one for a lot of people. Maybe you started a project or collection of quilting, sewing, or other craft supplies years ago but never found the time to actually use them. You keep telling yourself you’ll use all that yarn someday, when you have more time. Then you look at it and feel guilty – so you stuff it further back into the closet. Sound familiar? Craft supplies often represent a “sunken cost” of either time or money and therefore are difficult to let go of. BUT – once you DO let go of them – you’ll feel so much lighter and more free. You won’t have that guilt hanging over you. So if you haven’t picked up the half-done quilt, the knitting needles, or the yarn in a few years – give it away to someone who WILL use it. You’ll feel so much better!

3. Sample-sized lotions + bathroom stuff
Those tiny tubes and little hotel-sized shampoos and lotions? Get rid of them! That stuff is gunky, funky, and probably past it’s expiration date. You don’t need a drawer full of “just in case” lotions and stuff. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a simplified, relaxing bathroom? This is an easy item to toss. Ask yourself, “why is it so hard for me to let of things that were FREE?” And while you’re doing this, throw away any old makeup or the lotions and products that are more than a few years old. That stuff DOES expire!

4. Your “some day I’m going to get this tailored” pile
I used to have a bag of clothes that were “going to have tailored” – dresses that were a little too big, pants that needed hemming, and other things that just didn’t fit me quite right. If you’re holding on to a pile of things you haven’t made the time to bring to the tailor, ask yourself why. Are you really willing to spend money making those things fit you? Do you have enough clothes in your closet already? Why haven’t you had them tailored yet? This also goes for shoes that you’ve been meaning to have cobbled but haven’t found the time to get them fixed.

5. Quitters
If you have a sock and underwear drawer that you haven’t seen the bottom of in years, it’s time to find and toss the quitters. Quitters are the underwear whose elastic has given out, so they no longer stay up. Quitter socks just droop down on your ankles all sad and uncomfortable. No one likes quitters. So go through your underthings and socks and get rid of all the old ones, stained ones, orphans (one of the pair is lost) and the quitters. This can be a yearly exercise to keep your undergarments in check.

These are just a few things you can downsize this weekend without getting into too much emotional territory. Downsizing is a LONG and sometimes very difficult process. My journey from 1200 square feet (plus storage) into a 100 square foot vintage camper and then into a backpack for extensive travel took me almost 2 years! It doesn’t happen overnight. BUT the good thing about starting now is that every tiny little baby step you make gives you momentum and confidence to keep making progress. Once you’ve tackled the easy stuff, you’ll have the tools you need to start the big bad stuff – heirlooms, paperwork, personal items, clothing and more.

If you want to downsize your stuff, clear out the clutter, create mental and physical space in your life for more joy and happiness, you should join us for the next session of the Tiny Transition and Downsizing E-Course. Class starts on March 1st, and you can register here. You’ll get 8 weeks of practical lessons and challenges, guided step by step help, lifetime access to the private class forum, accountability, support and motivation from me and your classmates, and the tools you need to simplify your home and life.

I hope you’ll join us and I look forward to supporting you on this journey!